New acquisitions Caribbean (March 2018)

churchparadise

Paradise destroyed : catastrophe and citizenship in the French Caribbean / Christopher M. Church

Over a span of thirty years in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, the French Caribbean islands of Martinique and Guadeloupe endured natural catastrophes from all the elements—earth, wind, fire, and water—as well as a collapsing sugar industry, civil unrest, and political intrigue. These disasters thrust a long history of societal and economic inequities into the public sphere as officials and citizens weighed the importance of social welfare, exploitative economic practices, citizenship rights, racism, and governmental responsibility. Paradise Destroyed explores the impact of natural and man-made disasters in the turn-of-the-century French Caribbean, examining the social, economic, and political implications of shared citizenship in times of civil unrest. French nationalists projected a fantasy of assimilation onto the Caribbean, where the predominately nonwhite population received full French citizenship and governmental representation. When disaster struck in the faraway French West Indies—whether the whirlwinds of a hurricane or a vast workers’ strike—France faced a tempest at home as politicians, journalists, and economists, along with the general population, debated the role of the French state not only in the Antilles but in their own lives as well. Environmental disasters brought to the fore existing racial and social tensions and held to the fire France’s ideological convictions of assimilation and citizenship. Christopher M. Church shows how France’s “old colonies” laid claim to a definition of tropical French-ness amid the sociopolitical and cultural struggles of a fin de siècle France riddled with social unrest and political divisions.

Call Number 174: CEDLA 80.3338.CH

in the UvA CataloguePlus


nixonresisting

Resisting paradise : tourism, diaspora, and sexuality in Caribbean culture / Angelique V. Nixon

Call Number 174: CEDLA 70.0760.NI

in the UvA CataloguePlus


whiteheadof

Of cannibals and kings : primal anthropology in the Americas / Neil L. Whitehead

Call Number 174: CEDLA 70.3250.WH

in the UvA CataloguePlus


bulmereconomic

The economic history of the Caribbean since the Napoleonic wars / Victor Bulmer-Thomas

Call Number 174: CEDLA 70.3270.BU

in the UvA CataloguePlus


borensugar

Sugar, slavery, Christianity and the making of race / Mark Edelman Boren

Call Number 174: CEDLA 70.3287.BO

in the UvA CataloguePlus


baroncinema

The cinema of Cuba : contemporary film and the legacy of revolution / edited by Guy Baron and Ann Marie Stock with Antonio Álvarez Pitaluga

Call Number 174: CEDLA 71.1254.BA

in the UvA CataloguePlus


campbellcuban

Cuban economists on the Cuban economy / edited by Al Campbell

Call Number 174: CEDLA 71.3900.CA

in the UvA CataloguePlus


shoaffborders

Borders of visibility : Haitian migrant women and the Dominican nation-state / Jennifer L. Shoaff

Call Number 174: CEDLA 73.0140.SH

in the UvA CataloguePlus


garciaslaves

Slaves in paradise : a priest stands up for exploited sugarcane workers / Jesús García

Call Number 174: CEDLA 73.4100.GA

in the UvA CataloguePlus


forsdicktoussaint

Toussaint Louverture : a black Jacobin in the age of revolutions / Charles Forsdick and Christian Høgsbjerg

Call Number 174: CEDLA 75.3212.FO

in the UvA CataloguePlus


hughesapocalypse

Apocalypse 1692 : empire, slavery, and the great Port Royal earthquake / Ben Hughes

Call Number 174: CEDLA 77.3289.HU

in the UvA CataloguePlus


 

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