New acquisitions Mexico (August 2018)

The Mexican heartland : how communities shaped capitalism, a nation, and world history, 1500-2000 / John Tutino

The Mexican Heartland provides a new history of capitalism from the perspective of the landed communities surrounding Mexico City. In a sweeping analytical narrative spanning the sixteenth century to today, John Tutino challenges our basic assumptions about the forces that shaped global capitalism—setting families and communities at the center of histories that transformed the world. Despite invasion, disease, and depopulation, Mexico’s heartland communities held strong on the land, adapting to sustain and shape the dynamic silver capitalism so pivotal to Spain’s empire and world trade for centuries after 1550. They joined in insurgencies that brought the collapse of silver and other key global trades after 1810 as Mexico became a nation, then struggled to keep land and self-rule in the face of liberal national projects. They drove Zapata’s 1910 revolution—a rising that rattled Mexico and the world of industrial capitalism. Although the revolt faced defeat, adamant communities forced a land reform that put them at the center of Mexico’s experiment in national capitalism after 1920. Then, from the 1950s, population growth and technical innovations drove people from rural communities to a metropolis spreading across the land. The heartland urbanized, leaving people searching for new lives—dependent, often desperate, yet still pressing their needs in a globalizing world. A masterful work of scholarship, The Mexican Heartland is the story of how landed communities and families around Mexico City sustained silver capitalism, challenged industrial capitalism—and now struggle under globalizing urban capitalism.

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.3270.TU

in the UvA CataloguePlus


morakuxlejal

Kuxlejal politics : indigenous autonomy, race, and decolonizing research in Zapatista communities / Mariana Mora

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.0810.MO

in the UvA CataloguePlus


chavezsounds

Sounds of crossing : music, migration, and the aural poetics of Huapango Arribeño / Alex E. Chávez

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.1253.CH

in the UvA CataloguePlus


gibleri

I couldn’t even imagine that they would kill us : an oral history of the attacks against the students of Ayotzinapa / John Gibler

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.1900.GI

in the UvA CataloguePlus


yehpassing

Passing : two publics in a Mexican border city / Rihan Yeh

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.2930.YE

in the UvA CataloguePlus


smithpower

The power and politics of art in postrevolutionary Mexico /

Stephanie J. Smith

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.3230.SM

in the UvA CataloguePlus


kazanjianbrink

The brink of freedom : improvising life in the nineteenth-century Atlantic world / David Kazanjian

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.3286.KA

in the UvA CataloguePlus


limporous

Porous borders : multiracial migrations and the law in the U.S.-Mexico borderlands / Julian Lim

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.3293.LI

in the UvA CataloguePlus


heskethspaces

Spaces of capital/spaces of resistance : Mexico and the global political economy / Chris Hesketh

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.3610.HE

in the UvA CataloguePlus


aridjisnews

News of the Earth / Homero Aridjis

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.3615.AR

in the UvA CataloguePlus

 


mendezdisrupting

Disrupting maize : food, biotechnology, and nationalism in contemporary Mexico / Gabriela Méndez Cota

Call Number 174: CEDLA 60.4570.ME

in the UvA CataloguePlus


 

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